Sunday, September 7, 2014

Ever Young: James Barnor - Photographer Accra-Ghana/London-U.K.





Miss Sarah Quansah, Ever Young Studio, Accra, c.1954




James Barnor documents societies in transition: Ghana moving towards its independence, and London becoming a multicultural metropolis during the ‘swinging 60s’. His extensive portfolio of street and studio portraiture spans over 60 years and different continents, many commissioned by Drum magazine, Africa’s first Black politics and lifestyle publication. In the early 1950s, Barnor’s photographic studio Ever Young was visited by civil servants and dignitaries, performance artists and newly-weds. During this period, he captured intimate moments of luminaries such as Kwame Nkrumah as he pushed for pan-African unity, and commonwealth boxing champion Roy Ankrah. In 1960s London, he photographed Mohammad Ali and BBC Africa Service reporter Mike Eghan.











Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Kamra-e-faoree - the Afghan Box Camera.
















Afghanistan is one of the last places on earth where photographers used a simple type of instant camera called the kamra-e-faoree for means of making a living. The hand-made wooden camera is both camera and darkroom in one and generations of Afghans have had their portraits taken with it, usually for identity photographs. At one stage it was even outlawed when former rulers of Afghanistan, the Taliban, banned photography, forcing photographers to hide or destroy their tools.The aim of the Afghan Box Camera Project is to provide some record of the kamra-e-faoree which as a living form of photography is on the brink of disappearing in Afghanistan.                                                                                         










Friday, August 8, 2014

The Yezidi's (or Êzidî, Yazdani, ایزدیان) - Children of the sun, primarily northern Iraq, Syria, the Caucasus, and since the 1990's Germany.
















The Yezidi are an ancient people, originally from Mesopotamia. The sun is their principal deity. In their morning prayers they offer up praise to the day-star, God’s reflection on Earth, just as they did several thousand years ago. Despite being sun-worshippers, they were actually among the world’s first monotheists, i.e. they believe in one God. The Yezidi are an ancient people, originally from Mesopotamia. Their main temple at Lalesh is now in Northern Iraq. As a result of the constant feuds with their Muslim neighbours, some Yezidi emigrated – initially to Turkey, then to Armenia; after perestroika about 30,000 of them ended up in Russia, the majority in the Krasnodar Region. They are pleasant, sociable, kind, hard-working people. They include people of various professions: from farmers and musicians to sportsmen and businessmen. The extraordinary warm feelings of the children for their parents arouse particular respect. “God cannot look after everybody, so he invented parents”, says 17 year-old Boris. The film features portraits of various people from different generations who are united by a common aim – to preserve their race, their culture and their traditions, and to live in friendship, peace and harmony with Russian people.






Monday, June 16, 2014

The last village cinemas in Slovakia - Cinema World.

















by Marek Janicik.

Real life stories and memories of local villagers give us a look into history of the cinema of the village Očová and show us its importance. Not only has the viewer an opportunity to be a witness of the cinema's celebration in the memories of people, but he can also witness the closure of this cultural village temple. Even though the cinema was a significant part of the village for over half of the century, villagers will have to give it their last goodbye. The trigger in this scenario is the digitalization of cinemas in Slovakia.Village Očová decided not to take a part in this action. Unfortunately, this means sending their cinema straight to execution. Will the last goodbye carry the smell of sadness or pride? That is the question.







Sunday, June 8, 2014

Unfinished Sicily, Italy.














by Zelig

Unfinished buildings have the beauty of what could have been.
Of what is not yet there.
Of what might be one day.

(Inspired by 'Le temps en ruines', Marc Augé)










Sunday, May 25, 2014

Hidden Gardens dedicated to peace, Glasgow, Scotland.















Angus Farquhar, Creative Director of NVA public arts organisation and founder of The Hidden Gardens returns ten years on to present the ideas which led to the creation of Scotland's first sanctuary gardens dedicated to peace. 
'Seed' provides an interesting insight of Angus' work and artistic process, interest in abandoned sites and urban regeneration. It also explores the betrayal by the Labour party leading upto the Iraq war and the disillusionment that caused in its supporters.

Thehiddengardens










Saturday, May 24, 2014

EU crisis - No Job Land, Spain.










No job land offers a look at the situation facing thousands of families in Spain because of long-term unemployment. Unprotected and at risk of social exclusion a group of unemployed people decide to unite to fight for a better future.

Made by Gabriel Pecot, Olmo Calvo and Eva Filgueira.


nojobland.com





Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

My first school, promoting education in Gilgit, Baltistan, North Pakistan.



























 Promoting education in Pakistan's remote northern area is important for children at a very young age. The learning conditions are very poor at times. Any little help we can give goes a long way. "








Photographer Andrea Francolini:

"Follow the second trip I have done for My First School in the region of Gilgit-Baltistan."







Sunday, April 27, 2014

South China Mall, Guangdong.















Six years after the 2005 opening ceremony of the South China Mall, its 892,000 square meters still afford it the title of the largest shopping centre in the world. Yet less than 1 per cent of the 2,350 planned shops are occupied. Five escalators are running in this megalomaniac project that has burst onto the former farmlands of Dongguan's suburbs, in the rich southern province of Guangdong.








Thursday, April 24, 2014

Transnistria, a region of internal displacement.






Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the countries that have gained their indepenence question their new identities. Transnistria, an enclaved zone, between Moldova and the Ukraine, is an unrecognized de facto state situated in the Republic of Moldova. Between Transnistria and Moldova, four languages are spoken daily: Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian and 'Moldavian'. This political entity with its own cultural attributes is not recognized by any country of the international community including Russia where its troops are still deployed. Transnistria has become a region of internal displacement. The United Nations uses this term to refer to people who live in situations of internal displacement as a result of conflicts or natural disasters.

jeanchristophe.org








Wednesday, April 23, 2014

City of Shadows, early 20th century Mugshots of Newtown Police Station, Sydney, Australia.


Joseph Messenger 





Valerie Lowe and Joseph Messenger were arrested in 1921 for breaking into an army warehouse and stealing boots and overcoats to the value of 29 pounds 3 shillings. The following year, when this photograph were taken, they were charged with breaking and entering a dwelling. Those charges were eventually dropped but they were arrested again later that year for stealing a saddle and bridle from Rosebery Racecourse. In 1923 Lowe was convicted of breaking into a house at Enfield and stealing money and jewellery to the value of 40 pounds. Despite their energetic illicit activities, the photographs present an unexpectedly tender view of Messenger, then 18, and Lowe, 19.






Matilda Devine, criminal record number 659LB, 27 May 1925. State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW Matilda ‘Tilly’ Devine used a razor to slash a man in a barber’s shop and was sentenced to two years gaol. She was Sydney’s best-known brothel madam and her public quarrels with sly-grog queen Kate Leigh provided the media with an abundance of material. Aged 25






William Cyril Moxley, Special Photograph number 1152, 12 February 1923, Central Police Station, Sydney. NSW Police Forensic





Photofilm by Mike Bernard
Mug shots taken at the New South Wales Police Department from the 1910s to 1930s.

In the early part of the 20th century police routinely went to places that respectable people did their best to avoid, the dark places where bad things happened. They were just doing their job - asking questions, taking photographs, writing reports. But now, nearly a century later, the fruit of that footwork offers us the most extraordinary and intimate record of the more troubled sides of everyday life in early 20th century Australia.
















Monday, April 21, 2014

National Hero, Li Ying, China’s most famous toilet attendant














Interview to Li Ying, probably China’s most famous toilet attendant. Li, who immigrated to Shanghai from the countryside aged 17, won the May 1st Labor Medal, one of the highest awards a Chinese worker can receive. She was also the first rural immigrant in Shanghai to be granted residence status in the city, for her public service in the toilet. Li is proud of the prizes, of course, but also of her toilet. “Sometimes people walk on tiptoe after we have cleaned because they don’t want to make it dirty. I clean this place so well, people think it’s a hotel.”

colorsmagazine.com




Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Buzludzha monument, Bulgaria.







On the remote Buzludzha peak in the mountains of Bulgaria stands an unusual abandoned monument. The peak itself was the site of a battle between the Bulgarians and the Turks in 1868. In 1891 a group of socialists lead by Dimitar Blagoev met on the peak to plan for Bulgaria’s socialist future. To celebrate these events, the government in power during the height of Soviet influence decided to erect a monument commemorating socialist communism. After the government’s fall from power in 1989, the site was abandoned and left open to vandalism. The main entrance has been sealed and therefore closed to public. However, there is still a little way to get into the building.





Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Japanese Noh - nōgaku or nō, 能 - theater, performed in one of Asia's most famous crossroads, Samarkand, Uzbekistan.










Noh flutist and one of Japan’s Living National Treasures Jiro Fujita was giving a workshop in Uzbekistan, while Japan was hit by the earthquake. Not able to return, Fujita stayed in Uzbekistan for several weeks and felt he was hosted with great kindness and was immensely inspired by the beauty of Samarkand. He made a decision to return and offer two special performances dedicated to the people and the place.
Noh is a major form of classical Japanese musical drama that has been performed since the 13th century.

Filmed by Itai Keshet







Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Solar mamas by 'Why poverty?'





















Rafea is the second wife of a Bedouin husband. She and 27 other women from across the world are selected to attend the Barefoot College in India that takes uneducated middle-aged women from poor communities and trains them to become solar engineers. The college's 6-month programme brings together these women. Learning about electrical components and soldering without being able to read, write or understand English is the easy part. Witness Rafea's heroic efforts to pull herself and her family out of poverty.

Directors: Mona Eldaief & Jehane Noujaim,  Producer: Mette Heide, Produced by Plus Pictures.







Saturday, February 8, 2014

Mushrooms of Concrete, Albania's abandoned cold war bunkers.























Documentary by Martijn Payens
Over 750,000 bunkers were built under the direction of communist dictator Enver Hoxha, who ruled Albania as one of the most isolationist Stalinists from the end of World War II until his death in 1985. 
The concrete constructions scar the Albanian countryside, a permanent reminder of this "crime against ourselves." But to a younger generation they are not solely a bitter reminder, for they also offer an opportunity for a better future. The concrete mushrooms are being used as commercial space, nightclubs, storage facilities and high-end restaurants. They are displayed to tourists with pride: 


"The bunkers are our cathedrals." 

map of albania 

martijnpayens.com